Wharton Studio Museum -- Ithaca, NY

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Silent Movie under the stars

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Our 7th Annual Silent Movie Under the Stars is coming up in late August!

Stay tuned for details! Last year’s screening of Tess of the Storm Country (1922) attracted our biggest audience to date to Taughannock Falls State Park.  We look forward to a wonderful evening of silent film and live music with Cloud Chamber Orchestra this summer!  WSM sincerely thanks M&T Bank for its ongoing sponsorship of Silent Movie Under the Stars.

Then & Now: Silent Film on Location in Ithaca, NY

View the past and the present all at once in this presentation of silent film footage shot in the Ithaca area in the early 1900s. This short video shows clips from silent films made in Ithaca overlaid onto video of those same locations today and includes then and now footage from Romance of the Air (1917) at the old Ithaca airfield (Cass Park today), from Patria (1916) at Greystone Manor (now the Cornell Sigma Chi fraternity), and from If Women Only Knew (1920) along Eddy Street and at the Eddy St. Gate.

Wharton Studio Museum gratefully acknowledges the volunteer video footage and editing work by Cornell students Greg Repucci and Scott Shull Partington.

Silent Film & Cognitive Science

Wharton Studio history at SCSMI Conference

On June 4, 2016, WSM’s Executive Director Diana Riesman was invited by Cornell’s Department of Cognitive Science to present a talk with images and film clips about the Wharton Studio at the closing dinner for the Society for Cognitive Studies of the Moving Image conference held at Cornell.  WSM is grateful to the Cog Sci Department – especially Julie Simmons-Lynch and Dr. James Cutting – for the invitation and wonderful opportunity.  The conference attendees — 85 academics from all over the world in the fields of psychology and film studies – were a welcoming and enthusiastic group.  Honored to be included along with historian and writer Barbara Tepa Lupack who spoke about race film making.  It was a swell night!

#OscarsSoWhite

Read #OscarsSoWhite, an informed commentary on this trending topic written by guest author Barbara Tepa Lupack for WSM’s Cinefiles-Ithaca blog. An author and editor of numerous books on American literature, film and culture, Ms. Lupack is a former Fulbright Professor, dean at SUNY/ESC, and a “New York State Public Scholar”.

Wharton Studio Museum is thrilled to announce that Barbara Tepa Lupack has joined the WSM Advisory Board. Among her many works is the recent biography on silent filmmaker Richard E. Norman:

Richard E. Norman and Race Filmmaking:400000000000001152196_s41 In the early 1900s, so-called race filmmakers set out to produce black-oriented pictures to counteract the racist caricatures that had dominated cinema from its inception. Richard E. Norman, a southern-born white filmmaker, was one such pioneer. From humble beginnings as a roving “home talent” filmmaker, recreating photoplays that starred local citizens, Norman would go on to produce high-quality feature-length race pictures. Together with his better-known contemporaries Oscar Micheaux and Noble and George Johnson, Richard E. Norman helped to define early race filmmaking. Making use of unique archival resources, including Norman’s personal and professional correspondence, detailed distribution records, and newly discovered original shooting scripts, this book offers a vibrant portrait of race in early cinema.”

Related link:
Norman Studios in Jacksonville, FL
Q&A With Richard Norman Biographer Barbara Tepa Lupack

Thank you to WSM 2015 Giving Tuesday Donors!

Wharton Studio Museum - Ithaca NY, Silent Film History

 

Thank you to our December 2015 Giving Tuesday donors! Your generosity and support is greatly appreciated!

What? You missed Giving Tuesday? It’s not too late to make a year-end contribution…see how here.

GivingTuesday

Dec. 1, 2015 is Giving Tuesday!
On that day GiveGab is waiving their 5% processing fee.
Please consider giving to your favorite nonprofits through this link toGive_Gab_Button_white

New Website in the Works

We’re building a new website…

Wharton Studio Museum - Ithaca NY Silent Film

to drive traffic to preserving and celebrating Ithaca’s role in the history of American film!

Painting the imaginations

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species, basic coloration patterns are shades of grey, usually with a lighter underside and often with lines and patches of different hue and contrast. Unlike most mammals, dolphins do not have hair, except for a few hairs around the tip of their rostrum (beak) which they lose shortly before or after birth.[23] The only exception to this is the Boto river dolphin, which has persistent small hairs on the rostrum.

Senses

Most dolphins have acute eyesight, both in and out of the water, and they can hear frequencies ten times or more above the upper limit of adult human hearing.[31] Though they have a small ear opening on each side of their head, it is believed hearing underwater is also, if not exclusively, done with the lower jaw, which conducts sound to the middle ear via a fat-filled cavity in the lower jaw bone. Hearing is also used for echolocation, which all dolphins have. Dolphin teeth are believed to function as antennae to receive incoming sound and to pinpoint the exact location of an object.[32] Beyond locating an object, echolocation also provides the animal with an idea on the object’s shape and size, though how exactly this works is not yet understood.[33] The Indus Dolphin is effectively blind. This may be because not much light penetrates the waters of the Indus river (due to suspended sediments), making the need for vision unnecessary.

The dolphin’s sense of touch is also well-developed, with free nerve endings densely packed in the skin, especially around the snout, pectoral fins and genital area. However, dolphins lack an olfactory nerve and lobes, and thus are believed to have no sense of smell.[35] They do have a sense of taste and show preferences for certain kinds of fish. Since dolphins spend most of their time below the surface, tasting the water could function like smelling, in that substances in the water can signal the presence of objects that are not in the dolphin’s mouth.

A group of dolphins is called a “school” or a “pod”. Male dolphins are called “bulls”, females “cows” and young dolphins are called “calves”.

Potter working a piece of clay

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species, basic coloration patterns are shades of grey, usually with a lighter underside and often with lines and patches of different hue and contrast. Unlike most mammals, dolphins do not have hair, except for a few hairs around the tip of their rostrum (beak) which they lose shortly before or after birth.[23] The only exception to this is the Boto river dolphin, which has persistent small hairs on the rostrum.

Senses

Most dolphins have acute eyesight, both in and out of the water, and they can hear frequencies ten times or more above the upper limit of adult human hearing.[31] Though they have a small ear opening on each side of their head, it is believed hearing underwater is also, if not exclusively, done with the lower jaw, which conducts sound to the middle ear via a fat-filled cavity in the lower jaw bone. Hearing is also used for echolocation, which all dolphins have. Dolphin teeth are believed to function as antennae to receive incoming sound and to pinpoint the exact location of an object.[32] Beyond locating an object, echolocation also provides the animal with an idea on the object’s shape and size, though how exactly this works is not yet understood.[33] The Indus Dolphin is effectively blind. This may be because not much light penetrates the waters of the Indus river (due to suspended sediments), making the need for vision unnecessary.

The dolphin’s sense of touch is also well-developed, with free nerve endings densely packed in the skin, especially around the snout, pectoral fins and genital area. However, dolphins lack an olfactory nerve and lobes, and thus are believed to have no sense of smell.[35] They do have a sense of taste and show preferences for certain kinds of fish. Since dolphins spend most of their time below the surface, tasting the water could function like smelling, in that substances in the water can signal the presence of objects that are not in the dolphin’s mouth.

A group of dolphins is called a “school” or a “pod”. Male dolphins are called “bulls”, females “cows” and young dolphins are called “calves”.